Posts Tagged ‘flipbooks’

‘Hello Kitty’ Likely Inspiration for Kate Spade Retail Campaign

Hello Kitty has made her mark in just about every market you can imagine. Originally started as a character decoration on a coin purse geared towards children in 1974, Hello Kitty has evolved into a pop culture staple- and has been the subject of television shows, theme parks, clothes, stationary sets, home appliances, and even laptops. As she grew in popularity, she was rebranded to be appealing to people of both genders and of all ages- something that was likely in the minds of the designers who put together Kate Spade‘s newest campaign.

‘Hello Tokyo,’ is a retail campaign launched by Kate Spade that revolves around the idea of 17 days in Tokyo. It includes Tokyo themed products like handbags featuring sushi patterns and iPhone cases with geishas printed on them, but also has a significant number of pieces that highlight a cat that bears a close resemblance to Hello Kitty, who has been an extremely lucrative licensed character in Japan since her creation. While the famed moon-faced cat, with her signature pink bow, is obviously a big part of Japanese culture, the campaign has taken a few measures to separate their cat, ideally preventing any legal issues.

The Kate Spade cat has a mouth and does not have a bow. These may seem like simple unimportant distinctions, but Hello Kitty’s bow position is one of the few ways of seperating her from her twin sister (who wears her bow on the opposite ear). In addition, Hello Kitty’s lack of a mouth was a very intentional part of her design. According to The Independent, Hello Kitty creator Sanrio designed her without a mouth because she’s meant to speak from her heart, something the Kate Spade cat clearly can’t do. In fact, the Kate Spade cat more looks more like the generic Japanese fortune cats, who send good luck and wealth waves to all they encounter. The decision to call the collection ‘Hello Tokyo,’ however, speaks volumes.

katespadehellotokyo.jpg

Regardless of whether the line was meant to draw from Hello Kitty or not, the fact is there is a large cat-culture throughout the world. The Independent reports that Hello Kitty accounts for £500 million of Sanrio’s annual turnover, a number that undoubtedly began a sharp increase when Hello Kitty products made their debut on the scene. Only time will tell if the Kate Spade cat has a similar effect on the brand, but Businessweek is reporting that the brand is already showing a sales boost.

Kate Spade // Sanrio

[h/t] Businessweek

Article source: http://www.psfk.com/2014/08/kate-spade-hello-tokyo-retail-campaign.html

 

For One Month, Copywriter Promises to Eat Only The Food He Finds In His Agency

samba_artos.jpeg

In a strange feat of, it would seem, boredom, MRY copywriter Sam Bartos has decided he will go one month eating only what he can find in his agency’s office. And he’s chronicling the whole thing on a blog called Adult Food Finder. Witty.

Already, he’s got the receptionist tipping him to food-fueled meeting in the conference room and co-workers passing him leftovers but for the most part, he’s on his own; scavenging what he can find laying about.

Apparently, he’s allowing himself to eat at home over the weekend but still, going for five days eating only what’s laying around the agency is impressive. Granted, an ad agency is just one step below a grocery store and a far cry from starving oneself on the street but kudos to Sam for the effort, whatever the motivation may be.

Of the ketchup packages he considered eating and, perhaps, the only nod to world food issues, Bartos writes, “We take for granted the fact that we live in an affluent enough society to have a distinct line between what is a ‘food’ and what is a ‘condiment’. Unfortunately for the situation i’ve put myself in, that distinction is a luxury I can no longer afford.” Nor, sadly, can many around the planet.

On a lighter note, Bartos is delighted to have found a Samba candy bar which, he notes, is just four letters shy of his entire name. What are the odds?

He’s mastered the skill of filling up on Thursdays with agency-supplied beer and popcorn and on Fridays because it’s bagel day. But for the rest of the week, he has to rely on un-eaten meeting food, bachelorette nosh and candy jar pickings.

How long before Subway, or any other resourceful food entity, reads this and “accidentally” leaves a sandwich at Sam’s desk every day for the rest of the month?

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/adrants/~3/LFQ-pynSuFg/for-one-month-copywriter-promises-to.php

 

Mirror takes a selfie and sends it to your phone

Trying on clothes in the changing rooms always gives a better idea of whether an item is a good fit, but sourcing advice from friends isn’t easy if they’re not there to see it in person. While we’ve already seen Amsterdam’s Karl Lagerfeld Store has already used changing room tablets to enable shoppers to snap their new look and share it with friends, France-based Pixglass now wants to make the process easier, with a camera-enabled mirror that digitally captures whatever is in front of it.

The system uses a one-way sheet of glass with a mirror on one side, concealing the camera on the other side. Users can connect their mobile device to the mirror using wifi and control it with the Pixglass app. The camera is capable of taking photos, panoramas, photo bursts and video in a variety of aspect ratios chosen by the user. When they’ve finished, the photos and videos are saved to their device.

Rather than relying on someone else to take a photo or relying on awkward selfie angles, Pixglass replicates pretty much exactly what’s reflected in the mirror. This means the mirror acts as a kind of photo ‘preview’, giving users more control over the final image. The mirror could be installed in changing rooms, enabling shoppers to instantly take a photo of their outfit and share it with friends, or also at event functions, allowing groups to take a photo without leaving anyone out.

Watch the video below (in French) to find out more about Pixglass:

Obviously, there are privacy concerns involved with the system, most notably how the photos and video are stored once they’ve been captured. It remains to be seen how Pixglass will overcome these issues, but the technology is currently being trialled in various locations around Paris. Are there other ways to integrate technology into otherwise ‘dumb’ objects?

Website: www.pixglass.com
Contact: contact@dactyle.com

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/springwise/~3/sposYmkyGnY/story01.htm

 

Lovely Ad for Pinterest Shows How It Can Inspire Collaborative Brilliance (or at Least Dinner)

Pinterest touts its newly unveiled messaging feature in this handsomely shot two-and-a-half minute video from production house Strike Anywhere.

The clip is Apple-esque, as are so many personal-tech ads these days, celebrating Pinterest’s heightened functionality as a means of enhancing everyday life. Using the new messaging system, people engage in pithy yet productive text conversations about pins showing canoes, casseroles and spaceships. This demonstrates Pinterest’s ability to help folks collaboratively plan outings, dinners and work projects. (Of course, it could also create fresh opportunities for advertisers.)

The music track, Kishi Bashi’s “Philosophize in It! Chemicalize With It!” is a fine choice. It’s uplifting and accessible, but doesn’t overpower the spot. It works here, and would work equally well in any number of recent ads for Apple, Samsung or Microsoft. In fact, this spot, while true to Pinterest’s vibe, is a good example of how ads for tech companies increasingly blur the picture, instead of putting their services into sharper focus.

But for Pinterest, building on earlier long-form ads, it represents a noticeable step toward being a major marketer in the social tech arena. Take a look below and see what you think.

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Adfreak/~3/my81X8-z04k/story01.htm

 

3D-Printed Shoes: Novelty or Fashion Accessory?

Are these 3D-printed shoes made for walking? Short answer: nope. They are certainly wearable, albeit plastic isn’t the most comfortable material, but women have worn worse for fashion’s sake.

Introducing the 3D printed United Nude ‘Float’ Shoes. The shoe brand teamed up with 3D Systems and launched the shoes at its flagship store in New York City in August. Nestled in its NoHo retail space, United Nude now houses a 3D Systems Cube 3D Printer with an interactive touchscreen console that lets consumers tinker with customized color designs and then print shoes in store. It’s like a dreamlike vending machine, here to dispense geometric plastic shapes which can then be puzzle pieced together into the footwear of the future.

Screen Shot 2014-08-19 at 5.11.49 PM.png

The ‘Float’ shoe is designed in three parts that assemble to form the final product. With the new 3D Systems Cube printer, the biggest part takes roughly 15 hours to print, totaling around 40 hours to print a pair. A hand cut rubber outsole is then added for enhanced comfort – but comfort isn’t what these Jetsons-chic feet gems are about. They are symbolic of pushing the boundaries of fashion tech.

Screen Shot 2014-08-19 at 5.33.21 PM.png

Even though this shoe is wearable, I don’t think it’s to be compared with any more conventional shoes in regards to comfort, but that’s also not the point of this design, United Nude Founder and Creative Director Rem D Koolhaas says. This design is about creating something beautiful and interesting and it’s about experimenting, moving forward and about learning.

A United Nude salesperson told me that the 3D printer has lured in a lot of foot traffic to the flagship store, though passersby mostly stop in to ogle at the device rather than to actually purchase a pair of the $99 “Float” shoes. Koolhaas tells PSFK:

People really love to see the 3D printing in action. It’s a bit magical how a product suddenly appears right in front of your eyes.

The 3D-printed shoes are, for now, seen as more of a novelty item than a fashion accessory. Koolhaas adds:

At the moment it’s more for the show and to trigger people’s creativity and imagination. New technologies like 3D printing have so much to offer, and now that it has become so much more affordable, it’s such a great moment for more people to get involved. People creating and appreciating creations together is rich.

3D printing technologies are still very much in development, and Koolhaas doesn’t think 3D printing will replace any other production method for consumer goods “in the near future.”

…but perhaps one day most things will be 3D printed. If this would be the case, then the retail landscape would look different beyond someone’s imagination.

I decided to test out the “Float” footwear by taking them out for a stroll. My primary concern was that the shoe wouldn’t be able to withstand the jaggedness of NoHo’s cobblestone streets – I have seen a pair of 3D-printed shoes break to pieces on even the sleekest of runways. Though the rubber outsole quelled my fears of leaving behind a trail of plastic scraps. However, both the lightness of the shoe and lack of support had me wondering how far I could (what could best be described as) hobble along before I took a spill. But where these 3D-printed shoes lack in function they certainly make up for in aesthetic.

Screen Shot 2014-08-19 at 5.33.13 PM.png

Now, if fashion brands like United Nude incorporate technology allowing for more functional 3D-printed shoes, they can evolve from novelty to modern footwear. The Float shoes could take cues from Recreus’ Sneaker II in terms of wearability. These Back to the Future-inspired shoes use super-thin flexible filament – just 1.75 mm thick – to create the perfect balance between support and coziness. I mean, if I could commute in these Floats without sacrificing an intact anklebone, I’d rock them. Until winter, that is.

Article source: http://www.psfk.com/2014/08/3d-printed-shoes-united-nude-fashion-novelty.html